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on the story. will the tax deduction for your mortgage be sacrificed to fix the federal budget? nancy cordes and dean reynolds look at the proposals. elizabeth palmer shows us what a dictatorship doesn't want you to see: the ruin of a nation in civil war. and africa's mighty elephants are slaughtered for their tusks. so who's buying that illegal ivory? holly williams shows us in a hidden camera investigation. >> oh, wow. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. today susan rice had high hopes for what might have been the most important diplomatic mission of her career so far. but the u.s. ambassador to the united nations' attempt to reach agreement with republican senators today failed. rice is a favorite of the president's to be nominated as secretary of state to replace hillary clinton. if he does nominate race, she would have to be approved by the senate. margaret brennan is covering for us tonight. margaret? >> reporter: good evening, scott. ambassador rice asked for the meetings on capitol hill today in hopes of
, that is the tax increase that is coming five weeks from tonight. we asked our research department to add it all up for us. for a household earning $20,000 to $40,000 it would mean a tax increase of $1,200. an income of $40,000 to $64,000 would see an increase of $2,000 and an income of $64,000 to $109,000, would see an increase of $3,500. again, that will happen at the first of the year unless the president and congress agree on another way to fix the federal budget. what are the prospects of that? congressional correspondent nancy cordes is on capitol hill for us tonight. nancy? >> reporter: scott, both parties returned to capitol hill from thanksgiving loudly proclaiming their willingness to compromise but refusing to back it up with much specifics. top senate aides tell me that's because these negotiations are really taking place between just two people: house speaker john boehner and the president. boehner and the president spoke by phone on saturday, agreeing not to share details. but senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said today the g.o.p. wants the president to make the first move and
drops on new year's eve, tax hikes and severe spending cuts will kick in automatically unless a deal is reached. wyatt andrews spoke with two men who say they know how it should be done, if only washington would listen. >> reporter: two years ago, the fiscal commission chaired by democrat erskine bowles and former republican senator alan simpson proposed every basic element of the fiscal cliff solution being discussed now. their plan was a mixture of higher taxes, lower spending and the reform of medicare and social security. both men told us sacrifice has to come from everyone. >> all of us have to have some skin in the game to get it done. >> if you want something, pay for it. it's a sick idea, but it is an interesting idea. >> reporter: their biggest idea was to increase revenue by combining both the president's demand for higher taxes on the rich and the republican proposal to get rid of tax loopholes. bowles/simpson would eliminate almost every tax deduction for individuals and corporations, with only a few exceptions for charity donations and home mortgage interests. >> this st
, there will be huge automatic tax increases and spending cuts. dave cote knows what's at stake. he's the c.e.o. of honeywell and a member of the simpson-bowles commission which came up with the budget plan. last week, president obama sought his advice. we asked cote to put america's debt into perspective by comparing it to the size of the overall economy. >> our debt is higher as a percent of g.d.p. today than it has been at any time in our history since the revolutionary war with the exception of the end of world war ii when we had a very good reason to be doing that. so we have to do something. >> pelley: what is the size of the problem? >> our net debt today if you include the impact of borrowing from social security is about $11 trillion today and over the next ten years grows to about $20 trillion. that means our annual interest bill would be a trillion dollars a year. it's ridiculous! >> pelley: dave cote knows about fixing finances. he pulled honeywell out of a slump. it's one of america's largest industrial conglomerates. 130,000 employees make products ranging from aircraft parts
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4